Chazen Museum of Art

News

Three Exhibitions Open at Chazen Museum of Art
in April 2012:

A major glass exhibition celebrating the influence of Harvey Littleton 
and the UW–Madison studio glass program

A selective history of photography from the Baker/Pisano Collection

A graduate student exhibition honoring the winner of the first Chazen Prize

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
* * * UPDATED MARCH 26, 2012 * * *

Madison, Wisconsin, February 13, 2012—Three exhibitions opening at the Chazen Museum of Art in April 2012 will offer visitors a bounty of works in contemporary studio glass, the history of photography, and thought-provoking furniture sculpture.

Spark and Flame: 50 Years of Art Glass and the University of Wisconsin–Madison draws from four major glass collections to offer an overview of the roots and long-lasting influence of Harvey Littleton and the studio glass program at the UW–Madison. Fixed Images: Photographs from the Baker/Pisano Collection presents a selective history of photography through notable images recently donated to the museum. The First Chazen Prize to an Outstanding MFA Student will give visitors an opportunity to see the work of an exemplary MFA student in the art department.

Spark and Flame: 50 Years of Art Glass and the University of Wisconsin–Madison
April 21–August 5, 2012, Pleasant T. Rowland Galleries

2012 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the studio glass program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The program, started by Harvey Littleton, revolutionized art glass in the United States by teaching individuals to make blown glass—previously factory-produced—in small studios.

Professor Harvey Littleton began his career at the UW in 1951 as a ceramicist. In the late ’50s he became interested in molten glass as a neglected American art form and traveled to Europe for research. In 1962, after organizing a workshop at the Toledo Museum of Art, he launched the first studio hot glass program at a U.S. university, beginning with an independent study class at his studio in Verona, Wisconsin. Under Littleton, the UW’s program and his early students—Dale Chihuly, Fritz Dreisbach, Sam Herman, Marvin Lipofsky, Tom McGlauchlin, Christopher Ries, and Michael Taylor—became leaders in the studio glass movement, spreading their knowledge and techniques across the country and around the world.

The exhibition Spark and Flame: 50 Years of Art Glass and the University of Wisconsin–Madison highlights the far-reaching influence of Littleton and the UW program. It will consist of two parts: the first focuses exclusively on works by Harvey Littleton; the second offers a survey of work by more than 100 glass artists, showing the national and international breadth of contemporary glass. Nearly 150 works will be drawn from four premier private glass collections: those of Harvey Littleton himself; Bruce and Ann Bachmann; Simona and Jerome Chazen; and David Kaplan and Glenn Ostergaard. Bruce Bachmann, David Kaplan, and Simona and Jerome Chazen are all UW–Madison alumni who became passionate about the studio glass program while students in Madison.

Spark and Flame: 50 Years of Art Glass and the University of Wisconsin–Madison is curated by Michael Monroe, director emeritus of the Bellevue Arts Museum, and previously executive director of the American Craft Council and curator-in-charge at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery. Monroe is also an alumnus of the University of Wisconsin.

RELATED PROGRAMS
April 20
• 3 p.m. Panel Discussion about Harvey Littleton and the founding of the studio glass movement. Participants: Maurine Littleton—who will begin with a short illustrated lecture about her father—Kate Vogel, and John Littleton. Moderated by Michael Monroe, exhibition curator. Room L140, Elvehjem Building
• 5:30 p.m. Lecture by exhibition curator Michael Monroe. Room L160, Elvehjem Building
• 6:30–8 p.m. Preview Reception. Music by the Paul Muench Trio, refreshments, and a cash bar. Lobby, Chazen Museum of Art

Friday, May 4, 5–9 p.m. Spring Gallery Night
5:30 p.m. Panel discussion with glass artists Fritz Dreisbach, Audrey Handler, Kim Harty, and Marvin Lipofsky. Moderated by Michael Monroe, exhibition curator.
6:15 and 7:15 p.m. Docent-led tours of Spark and Flame.

Thursday, May 10, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Screenings about Art
Three short videos reflect on Harvey Littleton’s pioneering artistry and inspiration. Presented in conjunction with Spark and Flame. This program will be repeated on June 7 and July 12.
•    Pioneers of Studio Glass, 2012, 24 min., produced by WGTE Public Media for the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass. A fascinating look at the 1962 Toledo Workshops where Harvey Littleton and Dominick Labino first experimented with making glass outside of the factory setting.
•    Harvey Littleton: From Artseen, 1997, 9 min. Littleton discusses his philosophy of art and works at the furnaces.
•    Luminous Impressions—Vitreographs: Printing from Glass Plates, 1997, 30 min. Among Harvey Littleton’s innovations is printmaking from glass plates. This video captures five artists—Laura Grosch, Herb Jackson, John Thein, Dan Welden, and Claire Van Vliet—creating vitreographs under the direction of master printer and artist Judith O’Rourke. 
Harvey Littleton and Luminous Impressions were made at the Littleton Studios in western North Carolina by filmmaker Stuart Grasberg.

Thursday, May 17, 7 p.m. Bridge Poetry Series at the Chazen Museum of Art
A dozen invited Wisconsin poets will read works inspired by the exhibition Spark and Flame. This is the first of a semi-annual program of poetry about art. Rowland Galleries

Thursday, May 24, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Screenings about Art
Glassmasters at Work: William Gudenrath, approx. 55 min., by filmmaker Robin Lehman for the Corning Museum of Glass, video. Shown courtesy of The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass. Auditorium. William Gudenrath, represented in Spark and Flame, is resident advisor in The Studio of the Corning Museum of Glass. The film gives students, artists, and anyone interested in the glass arts a unique opportunity to experience Gudenrath’s artfulness. The screening will be followed by a 30-minute tour of exhibition highlights.

Thursday, June 7, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Screenings about Art
Three short videos reflect on Harvey Littleton’s pioneering artistry and inspiration. Presented in conjunction with Spark and Flame. Repeat of May 10, program, see listing for details.

Thursday, June 28, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Screenings about Art
Glassmasters at Work: Lino Tagliapietra, USA, 59 min., by filmmaker Robin Lehman for the Corning Museum of Glass, video. Shown courtesy of The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass. Auditorium. Master glassmaker Lino Tagliapietra, represented in the Chazen’s permanent collection, was filmed at The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass during a private workshop. This video and its dramatic soundtrack offer a dazzling sensory experience of the master artisan. The screening will be followed by a 30-minute tour of exhibition highlights.

Thursday, July 12, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Screenings about Art
Three short videos reflect on Harvey Littleton’s pioneering artistry and inspiration. Presented in conjunction with Spark and Flame. Repeat of May 10, program, see listing for details.

Thursday, July 26, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Screenings about Art
Glassmasters at Work: Pino Signoretto, USA, approx. 55 min., by filmmaker Robin Lehman for the Corning Museum of Glass, video. Shown courtesy of The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass. Auditorium. Experience the drama and intensity of master glassmaker Pino Signoretto at work in The Studio of the Corning Museum of Glass. The screening will be followed by a 30-minute tour of exhibition highlights.

Fixed Images: Photographs from the Baker/Pisano Collection
April 14–June 24, 2012, Leslie and Johanna Garfield Gallery

The Baker/Pisano Collection offers a personal and selective history of photography from the 1840s through 1980s. With an emphasis on portraits, the collection includes images by influential photographers of famous and notable subjects, created with the most significant of the photographic methods and techniques developed since the invention of the camera.

The collection is particularly strong in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and records both the famous and the anonymous, from Abraham Lincoln, Oscar Wilde, Gertrude Stein, and Agnes Martin to soldiers, farmers, and laborers. The represented photographers are among the most famous of their times: early pioneers David O. Hill and Robert Adamson, Francis Frith, and Matthew Brady; early-twentieth-century trendsetters Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, and Paul Strand; and late-twentieth-century photographers Ansel Adams, Diane Arbus, Cindy Sherman, and Robert Mapplethorpe. The collection also traces the technical developments of photography from daguerreotypes, calotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes, to film negatives and gelatin-silver prints. Alumnus Frederick Baker’s generous donation, unique in the state of Wisconsin, is a significant addition to the museum’s permanent photographic collection.

Thursday, April 19, 5:30 p.m. Gallery Talk
Gallery talk about the exhibition Fixed Images: Photographs from the Baker/Pisano Collection by Andrew Stevens, Chazen curator of prints, drawings, and photographs. Mayer Gallery

First Chazen Prize to an Outstanding MFA Student
April 28–June 10, 2012, Oscar F. and Louise Greiner Mayer Gallery

Jason Ramey is the first winner of the annual Chazen Prize to an Outstanding MFA Student, awarded to a 3rd year UW–Madison Art Department graduate student. Ramey makes sculptural objects that merge functional furniture with architectural features, especially walls. There is a dynamic dialogue between object and architecture, with the furniture sometimes subsumed by the architectural element and at other times providing critical support for the structure.

The Chazen Prize is offered by the museum in collaboration with the Art Department. The winner is selected by an outside curator. This year’s curator is Michelle Grabner, professor and chair of the Department of Painting and Drawing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is a Wisconsin native and previously taught at the UW for 6 years.

April 27, 5:30–7 p.m. Reception
There will be a preview reception for First Chazen Prize to an Outstanding MFA Student in Paige Court.

Generous support for these exhibitions is provided by the Chazen Museum of Art Council, the Brittingham Fund, the Department of Art, and the Wisconsin Arts Board with funds from the State of Wisconsin and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional funding for Spark and Flame: 50 Years of Art Glass and the University of Wisconsin–Madison is provided by Dane Arts and the Evjue Foundation.

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Digital images for media use are available upon request. Contact: Susan Day, Editor, (608) 263-2068, sday@chazen.wisc.edu

The Chazen Museum of Art is open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free. The museum is located on the campus of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The main entrance is accessible to wheelchairs. Parking is available at the City of Madison State Street Campus Ramp (entrances on Frances and Lake streets) and under University Square. Metered parking is available in the UW lot 46 lower level. Evening and weekend parking is also available in UW lot 83 under Fluno Center, entrance on Frances Street, and in UW lot 7 under Grainger Hall, entrance on Brooks Street. The Chazen will provide sign language interpreters for associated programs by three-week advance request to Anne Lambert, Curator of Education, weekdays, (608) 263-4421 (voice). Information is also available by visiting our Web site at www.chazen.wisc.edu.

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